NADCP compliance now assured with Call2Test

Posted August 1, 2015 by Sam Hotchkiss

As the leader in random drug and alcohol test scheduling, Call2test is pleased to announce its call-in system is compliant with the NADCP Best Practice Standards. The standard recommends a 2/7 daily testing probability for drug court clients. The association suggests that this program reduces missed and dirty tests, and decreases recidivism.

Under a 2/7 probability, clients have a 2 out of 7 chance at testing every day of the week. As a result, clients are truly unable to know when and if they are done testing for the week. The program administrator can easily set a minimum number of tests per week in addition to a testing probability to create an ideal random testing schedule. The Call2Test system also generates reports demonstrating program compliance with NADCP best practices.

From the NADCP Best Practices manual 2015

Drug and alcohol testing is most effective when performed on a random basis (ASAM, 2013; ASAM, 2010; Auerbach, 2007; Carver, 2004; Cary, 2011; Harrell & Kleiman, 2002; McIntire et al., 2007). If participants know in advance when they will be tested, they can adjust the timing of their usage or take other countermeasures, such as excessive fluid consumption, to defraud the tests (McIntire & Lessenger, 2007). Random drug testing elicits significantly higher percentages of positive tests than prescheduled testing, suggesting that many participants can evade detection if they have advance notice about when testing will occur (Harrison, 1997).

Random testing means the odds of being tested are the same on any given day of the week, including weekends and holidays. For example, if a participant is scheduled to be drug tested two times per week, then the odds of being tested should be two in seven (28%) on every day of the week. For this reason, Drug Courts should not schedule their testing regimens in seven-day or weekly blocks, which is a common practice. Assume, for example, that a participant is randomly selected for drug testing on Monday and Wednesday of a given week. If testing is scheduled in weekly blocks, then the odds of that same participant being selected again for testing on Thursday will be zero. In behavioral terms, this is referred to as a respite from detection, which can lead to increased drug or alcohol use owing to the absence of negative consequences (Marlowe & Wong, 2008).

Likewise, the odds of being tested for drugs and alcohol should be the same on weekends and holidays as on any other day of the week (Marlowe, 2012). Weekends and holidays are high-risk times for drug and alcohol use (Kirby et al., 1995; Marlatt & Gordon, 1985). Providing a respite from detection during high-risk times reduces the randomness of testing and undermines the central aims of a drug-testing program (ASAM, 2013).